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October 24, 2012
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The Lord's Prayer


Nāmic


9 Ūvekṭa tāṇāptar tāṇūktama; Pītayahm ahtyāma iāmnau, nāmamayū mēhesyayu.

10 Rājyastāṭayū gāmaṭ, īm ksmāu amsāṃ iāmnau kāṇayū kṛsyau.

11 Kai hāhagajyai anapītamanau, tva hāhagajyamәṭēma ānapitabhantar vənṭā.

12 Kai na rārgәyāhm māhakāṇanṭa, amstā au tāhtanṭa rārgai: Tva ȷām rājyastāṭa kai barāḥ, kai dhāyam āhta. Amīn.

English



9 After this manner therefore pray ye: Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name.

10 Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven.

11 Give us this day our daily bread.

12 And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors.

13 And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen.
Well, this is an old language I have sort of given up on lately! It is a mixed a priori - a posteriori language with Indo-Iranian influences.

Phonologically, the part I like the most, it is extremely allophonic, with stops being fricativised and voiced in between vowels. Vowels harmonise, are sensitive to length and nasalise!

So, yeah, this is the Lord's Prayer in the Nāmic language, King James' version - enjoy! :D
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:iconbillyjb:
BillyJB Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2013
I like it! Especially when I recognise certain words! woop woop.
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:iconwaahlis:
Waahlis Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2013  Student General Artist
Haha, yeah, you wouldn't recognise them all, since it's a mixed a priori - a posteriori.... I'm actually revising the language to be related to Attian now...
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:iconbillyjb:
BillyJB Featured By Owner Jan 18, 2013
Cool shtuff!
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:iconzuloo37:
zuloo37 Featured By Owner Oct 24, 2012
Lots of /a/.
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:iconwaahlis:
Waahlis Featured By Owner Oct 25, 2012  Student General Artist
Indeed it is. Looots and lots of /a/'s, with the occasional /u/. Indo-Iranian sound laws messed things up a bit, but I like the /a/ sound so it didn't really bother me. :D

It's probable that there would've been a lesser degree of /a/'s had I created it just recently.
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